Health Care

Health Care

How do health care reform and taxes connect? The Affordable Care Act is single largest change to the tax code in two decades. Find help navigating the complexities of the new health care legislation, Medicare, Medicaid and other medical deductions.

Reply
Valued Pioneer
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-18-2018

Naturopathic medicine

We have over 5-figure expenses with a naturopathic practitioner and the prescribed supplements needed to heal my wife and 2 daughters from toxic black mold exposure.  This is in addition to $25K to remove the mold and reconstruct the house?  Is any of this tax deductible.  I cannot find naturopaths in IRS pub 502, but I can find various articles online stating that a judge ruled it OK.  I can't find anything about repairs to the house to remove the mold that had been there for 8+ years.

 

Serious responses only, please.  No group think of what it should be.

Council Member
Posts: 516
Registered: ‎04-06-2016

Re: Naturopathic medicine

There's a list of Deductible and Non-Deductible medical expenses on Page F-5 in IRS Pub 4012: https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p4012.pdf .  In the list of things you can't include as deductible medical expenses are "Nutritional supplements, vitamins, herbal supplements, "natural medicines," etc., unless recommended by a medical practitioner as a treatment for a specific medical condition diagnosed by a physician."

 

The question this brings up would be whether your naturopathic practitioner could be considered a medical practitioner. For this to be the case, your practitioner would need to be a licensed Medical practitioner-- like a physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant. So if your practitioner is a doctor who offers naturopathic options, and it's a treatment for a specific medical condition diagnosed by a physician, then it would be deductible as a medical expense on Schedule A otherwise they would not be deductible.

 

Regarding the mold remediation on your house it depends on the cause/source of the mold.  If the mold can be considered a "casualty" loss, then it may be deductible.  This page, https://www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc515, contains more information, including the following description of what can be considered a casualty loss: "A casualty loss can result from the damage, destruction, or loss of your property from any sudden, unexpected, or unusual event such as a flood, hurricane, tornado, fire, earthquake, or volcanic eruption. A casualty doesn't include normal wear and tear or progressive deterioration."

 

Karen

 

Valued Pioneer
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-18-2018

Re: Naturopathic medicine

The mold was caused by improper installation of the shower pan when the home was constructed in 2004.  So it was caused by a defined event, but grew over time.

Council Member
Posts: 516
Registered: ‎04-06-2016

Re: Naturopathic medicine

 "A casualty doesn't include normal wear and tear or progressive deterioration." This would be considered progressive deterioration and not a casualty loss so, unfortunately, wouldn't be deductible.

 

Karen