All Things Tax

All Things Tax

Like the title says, from the filing process and tax questions to tax policy and reform, you can search and share All Things Tax here. This is the place to find answers to all your general questions that don't fall under the other categories. And just a reminder: questions about software or online filing should be posted in DIY Products.

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Pioneer
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-06-2018

Filing a 1099 seperatley

I am a student and last year i hit a huge financial crisis and did some work on a private website. My father needs to do my taxes for me this year so that he can deduct some things off of college funds, ect and wants me to send over my tax forms. I really want to keep this work i did hidden from my family, but i need to file it as the money i made was un taxed, and i will owe them money. is there ANY possible way i can separately file a 1099 from my other taxes this year? i am desperate to figure something out.

thanks--

Esteemed Neighbor
Posts: 222
Registered: ‎02-28-2016

Re: Filing a 1099 seperatley

How much Is shown on your 1099-misc form?

Pioneer
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-06-2018

Re: Filing a 1099 seperatley

A little over 14,000
Highlighted
Esteemed Neighbor
Posts: 222
Registered: ‎02-28-2016

Re: Filing a 1099 seperatley

[ Edited ]

That's a lot! Congrats for working hard.

There is no way to file separate returns for a single individual. It must be included on a single tax return that I assume your father will prepare. More importantly, since I assume he wants to claim you as a dependent, it's extremely important for him to have all the facts. The last thing a father wants (maybe not the last) is a letter from the IRS.

 

"Even if you're a dependent, you'll generally need to file your own 2017 tax return if:

Your earned income (money you made by working) exceeds $6,350, or
Your unearned income (interest, dividends, capital gains, etc.) exceeds $1,050, or
Your business or self-employment net income (gross minus expenses) is at least $400, or
Your gross income (earned plus unearned) exceeds the larger of $1,050 or your earned income (up to $6,000) plus $350."